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The Role of Supramolecular Chemistry in Responsive Vectors for Gene Delivery

Supramolecular Aspects of Chemical Biology

  1. Caroline M. LaManna,
  2. Mark W. Grinstaff

Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9780470661345.smc176

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials

How to Cite

LaManna, C. M. and Grinstaff, M. W. 2012. The Role of Supramolecular Chemistry in Responsive Vectors for Gene Delivery. Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials. .

Author Information

  1. Boston University, Boston, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2012

Abstract

The investigation of the self-assembly between nucleic acids and cationic molecules, such as lipids, polymers, or dendrimers, has guided and will continue to guide the development of nonviral vectors for gene delivery. By engineering these types of supramolecular complexes to facilitate the transport, protection, and release of DNA, scientists are working to overcome the barriers that have limited transfection efficiencies. Understanding the self-assembly of cationic lipids into liposomes or micelles, as well as studying the structure of their resulting complexes with DNA, is key to enhancing gene delivery research. This chapter discusses cationic lipid–DNA supramolecular structures, their role in gene transfection, and the synthesis and evaluation of new responsive cationic lipids which aim to control both the complexation and release of DNA.

Keywords:

  • DNA;
  • gene delivery;
  • lipoplex;
  • liposome;
  • transfection;
  • responsive vector