Chapter 9. Self and Social Function: Art Therapy and Readiness for Treatment in a Therapeutic Community Prison

  1. Richard Shuker Chartered Forensic Psychologist Head of Psychology lead clinician2 and
  2. Elizabeth Sullivan psychology, PhD, doctoral Senior Research Officer Senior Research Fellow Senior Lecturer non-executive director3
  1. Bill Wylie MSc art therapist artist writer researcher Head of Art Therapy member invited tutor advisor

Published Online: 29 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470661444.ch9

Grendon and the Emergence of Forensic Therapeutic Communities: Developments in Research and Practice

Grendon and the Emergence of Forensic Therapeutic Communities: Developments in Research and Practice

How to Cite

Wylie, B. (2010) Self and Social Function: Art Therapy and Readiness for Treatment in a Therapeutic Community Prison, in Grendon and the Emergence of Forensic Therapeutic Communities: Developments in Research and Practice (eds R. Shuker and E. Sullivan), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470661444.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    HMP Grendon, UK

  2. 3

    University of Bedfordshire, UK

Author Information

  1. HMP Grendon Therapeutic Community Prison, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470990551

Online ISBN: 9780470661444

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Keywords:

  • therapeutic community prison, art therapy and readiness for treatment;
  • art therapy focus - bringing unconscious feelings to consciousness;
  • diagnostic and therapeutic functions of images;
  • setting an art session and art therapy methods;
  • time, space and colour - addressing one's past, present, and future in pictures;
  • art therapy and revealing oneself to oneself and others;
  • narrative movement - indicating one's capacity in therapy participation;
  • imagery produced by men unsuitable for group work

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Art Therapy

  • Setting

  • Rationale

  • Method

  • Time, Space and Colour

  • The Form of Intention

  • Imagery Produced by Men Unsuitable for Group Work

  • Conclusion

  • References