Chapter 5. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging, a New Frontier in Biostructural Techniques: Applications in Biomedicine

  1. Haroun N. Shah and
  2. Saheer E. Gharbia
  1. Simona Francese and
  2. Malcolm R. Clench

Published Online: 15 JUN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470665497.ch5

Mass Spectrometry for Microbial Proteomics

Mass Spectrometry for Microbial Proteomics

How to Cite

Francese, S. and Clench, M. R. (2010) MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging, a New Frontier in Biostructural Techniques: Applications in Biomedicine, in Mass Spectrometry for Microbial Proteomics (eds H. N. Shah and S. E. Gharbia), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470665497.ch5

Editor Information

  1. Department for Bioanalysis and Horizon Technologies, Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, UK

Author Information

  1. Biomedical Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUN 2010
  2. Published Print: 23 JUL 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470681992

Online ISBN: 9780470665497

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Keywords:

  • MALDI mass spectrometry imaging-new frontiers in biostructural techniques, and biomedicine applications;
  • matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI)-new imaging technology;
  • MALDI-MS profiling (MALDI-MSP)-closely related technique to MALDI-MSI;
  • instrumentation for MALDI-MSI;
  • atmospheric pressure MALDI (AP-MALDI)-for coupling MALDI and MALDI imaging to mass spectrometer types;
  • MALDI-MSI, continuously evolving-application in lifescience fields;
  • MALDI-MSI and medicine;
  • microbial molecular investigation by MALDI-TOF-MS;
  • MALDI-MSI, capable of significantly affecting lifescience fields

Summary

MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) is an advanced mass spectrometry technique that enables images of the distribution of xenobiotics and biomolecules such as lipids, peptides and proteins to be obtained directly from intact tissue sections. Uniquely amongst imaging technologies, multiple images of thousands of ions can be obtained simultaneously in a single analysis. Since images are obtained by simply monitoring the m/z of ions generated from compounds of interest antibodies and molecular radioactive or fluorescent probes are not required. Since its invention in 1997, this technology has proven to have an enormous potential to impact several lifescience fields. In this chapter, principles and applications of MALDI-MSI will be illustrated with particular attention to microbial investigation.