2. Introduction to Holographic Data Recording

  1. Kevin Curtis,
  2. Lisa Dhar,
  3. Adrian Hill,
  4. William Wilson and
  5. Mark Ayres
  1. William Wilson,
  2. Alan Hoskins,
  3. Mark Ayres,
  4. Adrian Hill and
  5. Kevin Curtis

Published Online: 30 JUN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470666531.ch2

Holographic Data Storage: From Theory to Practical Systems

Holographic Data Storage: From Theory to Practical Systems

How to Cite

Wilson, W., Hoskins, A., Ayres, M., Hill, A. and Curtis, K. (2010) Introduction to Holographic Data Recording, in Holographic Data Storage: From Theory to Practical Systems (eds K. Curtis, L. Dhar, A. Hill, W. Wilson and M. Ayres), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470666531.ch2

Editor Information

  1. InPhase Technologies, Longmont, CO, USA

Author Information

  1. InPhase Technologies, Longmont, CO, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 JUN 2010
  2. Published Print: 25 JUN 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470749623

Online ISBN: 9780470666531

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Keywords:

  • κ-space formalism;
  • Bragg-grating;
  • correlation multiplexing;
  • data storage;
  • holographic data recording;
  • holography;
  • Kogelnik’s coupled wave equation

Summary

The application of the principle of wavefront capture to data storage was first suggested by Van Heerden in 1963. This chapter covers the history of holographic data storage and reviews the basic physical principles and methods used to store data into a volume of material. It discusses achievable densities for volume holographic storage. Kogelnik’s analysis is a rigorous solution for diffraction in volume holograms. However, for many applications, coupled-mode analysis can be computationally difficult and may not yield an intuitive understanding of the physical processes. The κ-space formalism is very useful for developing an intuitive understanding of holographic systems, as well as for simulating system effects. In order to achieve high storage densities, many holograms are superimposed in the same volume. ‘Multiplexing’ is the term used for techniques designed to superimpose holograms in the same or nearly the same volume.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

Bragg gratings; multiplexing