Standard Article

Supramolecular Architectures Based on M(lone pair)…π(arene) Interactions for M[DOUBLE BOND]Se and Te

Organic Selenium and Tellurium (2013)

  1. Ignez Caracelli1,
  2. Ionel Haiduc2,
  3. Julio Zukerman-Schpector3,
  4. Edward R. T. Tiekink4

Published Online: 28 APR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9780470682531.pat0724

Patai's Chemistry of Functional Groups

Patai's Chemistry of Functional Groups

How to Cite

Caracelli, I., Haiduc, I., Zukerman-Schpector, J. and R. T. Tiekink, E. 2014. Supramolecular Architectures Based on M(lone pair)…π(arene) Interactions for M[DOUBLE BOND]Se and Te. Patai's Chemistry of Functional Groups. 1–16.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universidade Federal de São Carlos, BioMat, Departamento de Física, Buffalo, Brazil

  2. 2

    Facultatea de Chimie, Universitatea Babes-Bolyai, RO-400028 Cluj-Napoca, Romania

  3. 3

    Laboratório de Cristalografia, Estereodinâmica e Modelagem Molecular, Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP, Brazil

  4. 4

    Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Malaysia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 APR 2014

Abstract

An overview of intermolecular interactions occurring between each of selenium and tellurium centers, in both the +II and +IV oxidation states (i.e. with two and one available lone pairs) with arene rings, that is M(lone pair) ⋯ π(arene) interactions, in their crystal structures is presented. These M(lone pair) ⋯ π(arene) interactions are proven to be important in stabilizing supramolecular architectures in their respective solid-state structures. Thus, when operating in isolation of other intermolecular forms of association, for example hydrogen bonding and secondary interactions, M(lone pair) ⋯ π(arene) interactions usually lead to either zero- and one-dimensional supramolecular aggregation patterns often sustained by one donor and one acceptor M(lone pair) ⋯ π(arene) interaction per molecule. Intriguingly, examples are also presented for two- and even three-dimensional architectures stabilized by this supramolecular synthon alone, indicating that some molecules, often with higher nuclearity, can form multiple M(lone pair) ⋯ π(arene) interactions. Rarely, when the selenium or tellurium center is in the +II oxidation state does the element form two such interactions. In conclusion, it is suggested that any complete analysis of any selenium- or tellurium-containing crystal structure should include an evaluation for M(lone pair) ⋯ π(arene) interactions.

Keywords:

  • selenium;
  • tellurium;
  • supramolecular chemistry;
  • lone pair/arene interaction;
  • secondary interactions;
  • crystallography;
  • pi-interactions;
  • intermolecular forces;
  • crystal structure analysis