Chapter 25. What is the Evidence that Increasing Engagement of Individuals in Self-Management Improves the Processes and Outcomes of Care?

  1. William H. Herman2,
  2. Ann Louise Kinmonth3,
  3. Nicholas J. Wareham4 and
  4. Rhys Williams5
  1. Debra L. Roter1 and
  2. Ann Louise Kinmonth3

Published Online: 12 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470682807.ch25

The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care, Second Edition

The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care, Second Edition

How to Cite

Roter, D. L. and Kinmonth, A. L. (2010) What is the Evidence that Increasing Engagement of Individuals in Self-Management Improves the Processes and Outcomes of Care?, in The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care, Second Edition (eds W. H. Herman, A. L. Kinmonth, N. J. Wareham and R. Williams), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470682807.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Internal Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

  2. 3

    General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

  3. 4

    MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK

  4. 5

    School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA

  2. 3

    General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470032749

Online ISBN: 9780470682807

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • self-management;
  • type 2 diabetes;
  • patient participation;
  • patient empowerment;
  • patient activation;
  • group education;
  • social support;
  • Internet education;
  • patient–practitioner relationships;
  • communication;
  • patient engagement;
  • peer support

Summary

There is increasing evidence that collaborative decision making between patient and practitioner can lead to a more active and engaged patient in the treatment process with measurable improvements in knowledge, skills, well-being and clinical risk. There is trial evidence to support self-management approaches at the individual, group and social levels. However no studies have yet demonstrated effects on diabetes disease endpoints, and economic analyses are absent or weak. Moreover, mechanisms of action remain poorly understood and further research is still needed in those areas