Chapter 2. Effective Communication

  1. Angela Hassiotis Senior Lecturer2,
  2. Diana Andrea Barron Clinical Research Fellow2 and
  3. Ian Hall Consultant Psychiatrist3
  1. Diana Andrea Barron Clinical Research Fellow2 and
  2. Emma Winn1

Published Online: 16 OCT 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470682968.ch2

Intellectual Disability Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

Intellectual Disability Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

How to Cite

Barron, D. A. and Winn, E. (2009) Effective Communication, in Intellectual Disability Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook (eds A. Hassiotis, D. A. Barron and I. Hall), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470682968.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    UCL Department of Mental Health Sciences, London W1W 7EJ, UK

  2. 3

    East London NHS Foundation Trust, London E1 4DG, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Camden Learning Disabilities Service, London NW1 7JR, UK

  2. 2

    UCL Department of Mental Health Sciences, London W1W 7EJ, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 OCT 2009
  2. Published Print: 11 DEC 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470742518

Online ISBN: 9780470682968

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Keywords:

  • effective communication and professional obligations;
  • good practice points facilitating people communication with intellectual disability;
  • Our Health, Our Care, Our Say - A New Direction For Community Services;
  • people with intellectual disability and language skills;
  • communication development stages - understanding and improving communication;
  • components of communication - assessment and management of mental health disorders;
  • non-verbal communication - facial expression, body language and gestures;
  • sensory impairments and difficulties with pronunciation;
  • physical disability amongst people with intellectual disabilities;
  • Disability Distress Assessment Tool (DisDAT)

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Background

  • Professional obligations

  • Language skills of people with intellectual disability

  • The impact of context on communication

  • Working with others

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgements

  • References

  • Further reading