Chapter 1. Introduction to Basic Hemodynamic Principles

  1. George A. Stouffer MD
  1. James E. Faber and
  2. George A. Stouffer

Published Online: 15 APR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470692608.ch1

Cardiovascular Hemodynamics for the Clinician

Cardiovascular Hemodynamics for the Clinician

How to Cite

Faber, J. E. and Stouffer, G. A. (2007) Introduction to Basic Hemodynamic Principles, in Cardiovascular Hemodynamics for the Clinician (ed G. A. Stouffer), Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470692608.ch1

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405169172

Online ISBN: 9780470692608

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Keywords:

  • hemodynamic;
  • physiologic properties;
  • blood stream;
  • vascular resistance;
  • hydrostatic pressure

Summary

This chapter contains section titled:

  • Energy in the blood stream exists in three interchangeable forms: pressure arising from cardiac output and vascular resistance, hydrostatic pressure from gravitational forces, and kinetic energy of blood flow

  • Blood flow is a function of pressure gradient and resistance

  • Resistance to flow can be estimated using Poiseuille's law

  • Reynold's number can be used to determine whether flow is laminar or turbulent

  • Force developed by the ventricles is a function of preload or stretch—the Frank — Starling law

  • Wall tension is a function of pressure and radius divided by wall thickness—Laplace's relationship

  • The normal venous system is a low pressure, large volume reservoir of blood which enables cardiac output to increase rapidly

  • The pressure and velocity of a fluid in a closed system are related

  • The velocity of blood increases and pressure decreases as cross-sectional area of the blood vessel decreases

  • Resistance increases when blood vessels are connected in series and decreases when blood vessels are connected in parallel