Chapter 3. Vaccines: How They Work

  1. Darren R Flower

Published Online: 24 DEC 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470699836.ch3

Bioinformatics for Vaccinology

Bioinformatics for Vaccinology

How to Cite

Flower, D. R. (2008) Vaccines: How They Work, in Bioinformatics for Vaccinology, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470699836.ch3

Author Information

  1. Edward Jenner Institute for Vaccine Research, Compton, Berkshire, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 DEC 2009
  2. Published Print: 7 NOV 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470027110

Online ISBN: 9780470699836

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Keywords:

  • ‘vaccination’ and ‘immunization’ concepts;
  • Infection - natural enemy of medicine;
  • bacteria potent threat - innate adaptability;
  • vaccinology in empirical sciences;
  • epitopic vaccines;
  • innate and adaptive immune systems;
  • immunity and cellular components;
  • Class I and class II MHC molecules;
  • Class I antigen presentation pathway

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Challenging the immune system

  • The threat from bacteria: Robust, diverse, and endemic

  • Microbes, diversity and metagenomics

  • The intrinsic complexity of the bacterial threat

  • Microbes and humankind

  • The nature of vaccines

  • Types of vaccine

  • Carbohydrate vaccines

  • Epitopic vaccines

  • Vaccine delivery

  • Emerging immunovaccinology

  • The immune system

  • Innate immunity

  • Adaptive immunity

  • The microbiome and mucosal immunity

  • Cellular components of immunity

  • Cellular immunity

  • The T cell repertoire

  • Epitopes: The immunological quantum

  • The major histocompatibility complex

  • MHC nomenclature

  • Peptide binding by the MHC

  • The structure of the MHC

  • Antigen presentation

  • The proteasome

  • Transporter associated with antigen processing

  • Class II processing

  • Seek simplicity and then distrust it

  • Cross presentation

  • T cell receptor

  • T cell activation

  • Immunological synapse

  • Signal 1, signal 2, immunodominance

  • Humoral immunity

  • Further reading