Chapter 13. To Decide or not to Decide: Decision Making and Decision Avoidance in Critical Incidents

  1. David Carson,
  2. Rebecca Milne,
  3. Francis Pakes,
  4. Karen Shalev and
  5. Andrea Shawyer
  1. Marie Eyre and
  2. Laurence Alison

Published Online: 13 MAY 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470713068.ch13

Applying Psychology to Criminal Justice

Applying Psychology to Criminal Justice

How to Cite

Eyre, M. and Alison, L. (2007) To Decide or not to Decide: Decision Making and Decision Avoidance in Critical Incidents, in Applying Psychology to Criminal Justice (eds D. Carson, R. Milne, F. Pakes, K. Shalev and A. Shawyer), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470713068.ch13

Editor Information

  1. Institute of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Portsmouth, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Liverpool

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 MAY 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470015155

Online ISBN: 9780470713068

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Keywords:

  • decision making;
  • criminal justice;
  • police officers;
  • barristers;
  • critical incident managers

Summary

This chapter contains section titled:

  • Introduction—The All-Important Context

  • Traditional, Naturalistic and Pragmatic Approaches to Decision Making

  • Pragmatism and 10 000 Volts (10 KV)

  • Factors that Influence an Individual's Decision Making

  • Decision Avoidance

  • Organizational Context and Culture: Impact on Decision Making and Decision Avoidance

  • Multi-Agency Partnerships and Inaction Inertia

  • Conclusion

  • Postscript

  • References