Chapter 2. Clinical Patterns of Corneal Graft Failure

  1. Ruth Porter and
  2. Julie Knight
  1. A. E. Maumenee

Published Online: 30 MAY 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470719985.ch2

Ciba Foundation Symposium 15 - Corneal Graft Failure

Ciba Foundation Symposium 15 - Corneal Graft Failure

How to Cite

Maumenee, A. E. (2008) Clinical Patterns of Corneal Graft Failure, in Ciba Foundation Symposium 15 - Corneal Graft Failure (eds R. Porter and J. Knight), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470719985.ch2

Author Information

  1. The Wilmer Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAY 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1973

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9789021940168

Online ISBN: 9780470719985

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Keywords:

  • corneal transplants;
  • infections;
  • abscesses;
  • lymphocytic cells;
  • epithelial tissues

Summary

Corneal transplants fail or become opaque for several different reasons. The first is the immediate opacification of the graft, occurring from the first day after corneal transplantation to the second or third week. In technically successful transplants this is usually due to faulty endothelium on the donor button. Other obvious early failures are due to technical difficulties in the operative procedure, including apposition of the donor material, flat anterior chambers and trauma of the lens. Infections may result from infected donor material or stitch abscesses during the immediate postoperative period. An interesting phenomenon needing further investigation is the higher percentage of immediate corneal oedema that occurs in technically successful corneal grafts in aphakic eyes.