Chapter 2. Legitimacy and Contextual Issues in Traditional Lakota Sioux Healing

  1. Mario Incayawar M.D., M.Sc. Director2,3,4,
  2. Ronald Wintrob M.D. Clinical Professor5 and
  3. Lise Bouchard Ph.D. Director of Research2
  1. Jeffrey A. Henderson M.D., M.P.H.

Published Online: 28 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470741054.ch2

Psychiatrists and Traditional Healers: Unwitting Partners in Global Mental Health

Psychiatrists and Traditional Healers: Unwitting Partners in Global Mental Health

How to Cite

Henderson, J. A. (2009) Legitimacy and Contextual Issues in Traditional Lakota Sioux Healing, in Psychiatrists and Traditional Healers: Unwitting Partners in Global Mental Health (eds M. Incayawar, R. Wintrob and L. Bouchard), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470741054.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Runajambi – Institute for the Study of Quichua Culture and Health, Otavalo, Ecuador

  2. 3

    Former Henry R. Luce, Professor in Brain, Mind and Medicine: Cross-Cultural Perspectives, Pitzer, Claremont McKenna, USA

  3. 4

    Harvey Mudd Colleges, California, USA

  4. 5

    WPA-Transcultural Psychiatry Section, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

Author Information

  1. Black Hills Center for American Indian Health, Rapid City, SD, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 20 MAR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470516836

Online ISBN: 9780470741054

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Keywords:

  • issue of interface between traditional indigenous medical systems and dominant biomedical system;
  • legitimacy and contextual issues - indigenous healing in Americas;
  • issues in traditional Lakota Sioux healing;
  • complementary and alternative medicine (CAM);
  • traditional medicine - systems of medicine and healing developed before scientific medicine by indigenous peoples that are still in use today;
  • indigenous healing and healers in America – abundant ethnographic research;
  • biomedicine and traditional medicine systems - coexisting within pluralistic structure or ‘medical system’;
  • issues with legitimacy - classic Weberian Theory of legitimate rule to traditional medical systems;
  • Wicasa Wakan (literally, ‘holy man’), and healers - using plant and/or animal-based medicines or Pejuta Wicasa (literally, ‘medicine man’);
  • integrating traditional medicine with allopathic approaches - What aspects of traditional medical systems should be incorporated in a biomedical setting?

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Definitions

  • Research on Indigenous Healing in the Americas

  • Traditional Lakota Sioux Healing

  • Renewed Interest in Traditional Medicine

  • Rephrasing a Typical Question

  • Issues with Legitimacy

  • Reimbursement for Traditional Healing Services in the United States: What are we Getting Ourselves into?

  • Conclusion

  • References