Chapter Eleven. Recovered Memories

  1. Ray Bull Professor2,
  2. Tim Valentine PhD member Scientific staff Professor of Psychology Fellow3 and
  3. Tom Williamson
  1. James Ost Senior Lecturer

Published Online: 17 DEC 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470747599.ch11

Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions

Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions

How to Cite

Ost, J. (2009) Recovered Memories, in Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions (eds R. Bull, T. Valentine and T. Williamson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470747599.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Leicester, England, UK

  2. 3

    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychology University of Portsmouth, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 DEC 2009
  2. Published Print: 21 SEP 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470512678

Online ISBN: 9780470747599

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Keywords:

  • recovered memories;
  • psychologists, being involved in ‘memory wars’;
  • claims of childhood abuse - following ‘recovered memory therapy’;
  • people repressing or suppressing memories of trauma;
  • Think/No Think (T/NT) paradigm - cue to ‘remember’ or ‘forget’ target word;
  • four main ‘false memory’ methods;
  • DRM method (errors on word list (DRM) task;
  • parental misinformation method;
  • misinformation method and ‘crashing memories’ method;
  • challenges in false memory research

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Can people repress or suppress memories of trauma?

  • Four main ‘false memory’ methods

  • Ongoing challenges in false memory research

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgements

  • References