Chapter Six. From Criminal Justice to Control Process: Interrogation in a Changing Context

  1. Ray Bull Professor2,
  2. Tim Valentine PhD member Scientific staff Professor of Psychology Fellow3 and
  3. Tom Williamson
  1. David Dixon

Published Online: 17 DEC 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470747599.ch6

Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions

Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions

How to Cite

Dixon, D. (2009) From Criminal Justice to Control Process: Interrogation in a Changing Context, in Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions (eds R. Bull, T. Valentine and T. Williamson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470747599.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Leicester, England, UK

  2. 3

    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. Dean, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 DEC 2009
  2. Published Print: 21 SEP 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470512678

Online ISBN: 9780470747599

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Keywords:

  • from criminal justice to control process - interrogation in changing context;
  • questioning of suspects, in context of institutional practices, priorities and values;
  • investigative interviewing and awareness of contextual changes;
  • new paradigm ‘control process’- stark contrast to those of criminal justice;
  • central concepts of liberal democratic criminal justice - devalued in new control process;
  • parliaments, extending anti-terrorism legislation;
  • torture and interrogation;
  • interrogation, confessions and admissions - acceptable to a criminal justice paradigm;
  • interrogating terrorism;
  • Haneef convicted in London and Glasgow car bomb incidents - shift from risk to precaution

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • From criminal justice to control process

  • Torture and interrogation

  • Interrogating terrorism: three case studies

  • The resources and limits of law

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgements

  • References