Chapter Eight. The Relation between Consistency and Accuracy of Eyewitness Testimony: Legal versus Cognitive Explanations

  1. Ray Bull Professor4,
  2. Tim Valentine PhD member Scientific staff Professor of Psychology Fellow5 and
  3. Tom Williamson
  1. Ronald P. Fisher Professor Director1,
  2. Neil Brewer Professor member2 and
  3. Gregory Mitchell PhD, JD3

Published Online: 17 DEC 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470747599.ch8

Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions

Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions

How to Cite

Fisher, R. P., Brewer, N. and Mitchell, G. (2009) The Relation between Consistency and Accuracy of Eyewitness Testimony: Legal versus Cognitive Explanations, in Handbook of Psychology of Investigative Interviewing: Current Developments and Future Directions (eds R. Bull, T. Valentine and T. Williamson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470747599.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 4

    University of Leicester, England, UK

  2. 5

    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Florida International University, Miami, USA

  2. 2

    Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia

  3. 3

    University of Virginia, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 DEC 2009
  2. Published Print: 21 SEP 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470512678

Online ISBN: 9780470747599

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Keywords:

  • eyewitness testimony - consistency and accuracy;
  • legal versus cognitive explanations;
  • contradictions in witnesses' testimonies and witnesses' recollection of unreported facts;
  • legal approach - witness consistency, important measures of witness credibility;
  • ‘a prior self-contradiction - showing defect in memory or in honesty of witness’;
  • rationale of courtroom arguments and instructions;
  • Courtroom theory and Cognitive theory - retrieval processes and independence of components;
  • experimental testing - predictions of Courtroom and Cognitive theories;
  • inconsistent statements and resolving a puzzle;
  • alternative predictor of overall witness accuracy

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The legal approach

  • Rationale of courtroom arguments and instructions

  • Cognitive Theory

  • Conclusion

  • Recommendations

  • Limitations

  • Acknowledgement

  • References