14. Genetic and Environmental Factors in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

  1. Cheng Wang and
  2. William Slikker Jr.
  1. Angela A. Baker,
  2. Michele M. Taylor and
  3. Jason R. Richardson

Published Online: 15 NOV 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470917060.ch14

Developmental Neurotoxicology Research: Principles, Models, Techniques, Strategies, and Mechanisms

Developmental Neurotoxicology Research: Principles, Models, Techniques, Strategies, and Mechanisms

How to Cite

Baker, A. A., Taylor, M. M. and Richardson, J. R. (2011) Genetic and Environmental Factors in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in Developmental Neurotoxicology Research: Principles, Models, Techniques, Strategies, and Mechanisms (eds C. Wang and W. Slikker), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470917060.ch14

Editor Information

  1. National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Division of Toxicology Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, NJ, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 NOV 2010
  2. Published Print: 14 JAN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470426722

Online ISBN: 9780470917060

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Keywords:

  • genetic and environmental factors in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - significant public health issue;
  • neurochemical basis of behavioral dysfunction - DA and NE system interaction, and controlling behavior;
  • candidate gene approach - in exploring genetic etiology of ADHD

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Prevalence of ADHD in the United States

  • Clinical Characteristics

  • Neurodevelopmental Basis of ADHD

  • Neuroanatomical Basis of Behavioral Dysfunction in ADHD

  • Neurochemical Basis of Behavioral Dysfunction in ADHD

  • Neurochemical Action of Drugs Used to Treat ADHD

  • Genetic Factors in ADHD

  • Environmental Risk Factors

  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke

  • Lead

  • Polychlorinated Biphenyls

  • Alcohol

  • Perinatal Hypoxia

  • Head Trauma and Lesioning Studies

  • Gene–Environment Interactions

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgments

  • References