Chapter 23. The Plasticization-Antiplasticization Threshold of Water in Microcrystalline Cellulose: A Perspective Based on Bulk Free Volume

  1. Dr. David S. Reid President4,
  2. Dr. Tanaboon Sajjaanantakul5,
  3. Dr. Peter J. Lillford6 and
  4. Dr. Sanguansri Charoenrein7
  1. S. P. Chamarthy1,2,
  2. F. X. Diringer1,3 and
  3. R. Pinal1

Published Online: 14 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470958193.ch23

Water Properties in Food, Health, Pharmaceutical and Biological Systems: ISOPOW 10

Water Properties in Food, Health, Pharmaceutical and Biological Systems: ISOPOW 10

How to Cite

Chamarthy, S. P., Diringer, F. X. and Pinal, R. (2010) The Plasticization-Antiplasticization Threshold of Water in Microcrystalline Cellulose: A Perspective Based on Bulk Free Volume, in Water Properties in Food, Health, Pharmaceutical and Biological Systems: ISOPOW 10 (eds D. S. Reid, T. Sajjaanantakul, P. J. Lillford and S. Charoenrein), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470958193.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, California, USA

  2. 5

    Kasetsart University, Thailand

  3. 6

    Centre for Formulation Engineering, Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

  4. 7

    Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

  2. 2

    Respiratory Product Development, Schering - Plough Research Institute, Summit, New Jersey, USA

  3. 3

    and Faculté de Pharmacie, Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Srasbourg, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAY 2010
  2. Published Print: 11 JUL 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813812731

Online ISBN: 9780470958193

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Keywords:

  • plasticization - antiplasticization threshold of water in microcrystalline cellulose;
  • water - typical plasticizer reducing tensile strength;
  • carbohydrate polymers - major component in many products;
  • microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) - unique place in pharmaceutical applications;
  • environmental moisture - unintentional means of incorporating water into pharmaceutical tablets;
  • low levels of plasticizer - opposite of expected softening effect on polymer;
  • solid fraction of a tablet - portion of total tablet volume occupied by solid material

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Abstract

  • Introduction

  • Materials and Methods

  • Results and Discussion

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgments

  • References