8. Ecological Integrity and Biological Integrity

The Right to Food

  1. Thomas J. Sauer2,
  2. John M. Norman3 and
  3. Mannava V. K. Sivakumar4
  1. Laura Westra

Published Online: 7 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470960257.ch8

Sustaining Soil Productivity in Response to Global Climate Change: Science, Policy, and Ethics

Sustaining Soil Productivity in Response to Global Climate Change: Science, Policy, and Ethics

How to Cite

Westra, L. (2011) Ecological Integrity and Biological Integrity, in Sustaining Soil Productivity in Response to Global Climate Change: Science, Policy, and Ethics (eds T. J. Sauer, J. M. Norman and M. V. K. Sivakumar), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470960257.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment, Ames, Iowa, USA

  2. 3

    Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA

  3. 4

    Climate Prediction and Adaptation Branch, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland

Author Information

  1. Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 JUN 2011
  2. Published Print: 15 JUL 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470958575

Online ISBN: 9780470960257

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Keywords:

  • ecological integrity and biological integrity - and the right to food;
  • Pogge (2002), and centrality of global poverty - concerted action by global society;
  • ecological disintegrity and biotic impoverishment – humans, and natural ecosystem manipulation;
  • Western diets and other lifestyle preferences;
  • environmental sustainability;
  • harvest rates of renewable resource inputs - regenerative capacities of natural system;
  • agricultural food production, biodiversity and biotechnology - “Perils Amidst the Promise”;
  • biotechnologies, and rise of environmental problems;
  • novel organisms introduced - into natural systems;
  • genetically modified organisms - and legal status

Summary

The “right to food” has been addressed by many from different perspectives, but this chapter addresses an aspect of that problem that is not often viewed as significant: the centrality of ecological integrity to our environment, and the interface between it and the biological integrity of human beings, hence our survival, health and normal development. Thus we review briefly not only the public health aspects of the issue under consideration, including diet and the negative impacts of the meat industry on both persons and environment, but also the question of soil conditions and the impact of GMOs on agriculture. We conclude this brief survey by proposing ecological integrity and biological integrity as the twin aspect of what ought to be the main focus of the quest for novel instruments and policies intended to implement the right to food, globally.