13. Genetic Adjustment to Changing Climates: Maize

  1. Shyam S. Yadav PhD2,
  2. Robert J. Redden PhD3,
  3. Jerry L. Hatfield PhD4,
  4. Hermann Lotze-Campen PhD5 and
  5. Anthony E. Hall PhD6
  1. Mark E. Westgate1 and
  2. Jerry L. Hatfield PhD4

Published Online: 18 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470960929.ch22

Crop Adaptation to Climate Change

Crop Adaptation to Climate Change

How to Cite

Westgate, M. E. and Hatfield, J. L. (2011) Genetic Adjustment to Changing Climates: Maize, in Crop Adaptation to Climate Change (eds S. S. Yadav, R. J. Redden, J. L. Hatfield, H. Lotze-Campen and A. E. Hall), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470960929.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Agriculture—Capacity Development, Civilian Technical Assistance Program, General Directorate of Programs, Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation & Livestock, Government of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, Kabul, Afghanistan

  2. 3

    Australian Temperate Field Crops Collection, Grains Innovation Park, The Department of Primary Industries, Private Bag 260, Horsham, Victoria 3401, Australia

  3. 4

    USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment, 2110 University Blvd., Ames, IA 50011, United States of America

  4. 5

    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), P.O. Box 601203, 14412 Potsdam, Germany

  5. 6

    Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0124, United States of America

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, United States of America

  2. 4

    USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment, 2110 University Blvd., Ames, IA 50011, United States of America

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 23 SEP 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813820163

Online ISBN: 9780470960929

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Keywords:

  • Maize;
  • drought;
  • tolerance;
  • breeding;
  • temperature;
  • stress

Summary

The prospects for more widespread and frequent drought in the near future are placing considerable pressure on maize breeding programs to develop more drought tolerant germplasm. Despite the complexity of the plant's responses to water limited conditions, rational application of molecular/genomic approaches and high-throughput phenotyping tools holds promise for achieving major genetic improvements in the drought tolerance of this important crop. Reproductive development also is especially sensitive to high temperatures that typically accompany drought. Evaluation of germplasm to cope with these extremes will be necessary to continue the requisite increases in yields and yield stability needed to feed an expanding global population. Although the tools to achieve these goals are available, their fruitful application will require enhanced interactions among physiologists, geneticists, and molecular biologists.