2. Agroecology: Implications for Plant Response to Climate Change

  1. Shyam S. Yadav PhD1,
  2. Robert J. Redden PhD2,
  3. Jerry L. Hatfield PhD3,
  4. Hermann Lotze-Campen PhD4 and
  5. Anthony E. Hall PhD5
  1. Jerry L. Hatfield PhD and
  2. John H. Prueger

Published Online: 18 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470960929.ch3

Crop Adaptation to Climate Change

Crop Adaptation to Climate Change

How to Cite

Hatfield, J. L. and Prueger, J. H. (2011) Agroecology: Implications for Plant Response to Climate Change, in Crop Adaptation to Climate Change (eds S. S. Yadav, R. J. Redden, J. L. Hatfield, H. Lotze-Campen and A. E. Hall), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470960929.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Agriculture—Capacity Development, Civilian Technical Assistance Program, General Directorate of Programs, Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation & Livestock, Government of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, Kabul, Afghanistan

  2. 2

    Australian Temperate Field Crops Collection, Grains Innovation Park, The Department of Primary Industries, Private Bag 260, Horsham, Victoria 3401, Australia

  3. 3

    USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment, 2110 University Blvd., Ames, IA 50011, United States of America

  4. 4

    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), P.O. Box 601203, 14412 Potsdam, Germany

  5. 5

    Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0124, United States of America

Author Information

  1. USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment, 2110 University Blvd., Ames, IA 50011, United States of America

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 23 SEP 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813820163

Online ISBN: 9780470960929

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Keywords:

  • Energy balance;
  • water use efficiency;
  • physiological responses;
  • canopy level feedbacks;
  • temperature response

Summary

Agricultural ecosystems (agroecosystems) represent the balance between the physiological responses of plants and plant canopies and the energy exchanges. Rising temperature and increasing CO2 coupled with an increase in variability of precipitation will create a complex set of interactions on plant growth and water use. These interactions of temperature, CO2, and rainfall patterns within the growing season will affect plant growth in many different ways. The interaction of these parameters is complex; however, are further exaggerated by rainfall patterns during the growing season. Water is a dominant factor that will override the positive impacts of CO2 increases and further diminish plant growth and yield when coupled with temperature stresses. Changing climate will present a challenge to agroecology because of the impacts on plant growth and yield that will be required to feed an ever-increasing world population.