10. Bivalves as Bioturbators and Bioirrigators

  1. Sandra E. Shumway
  1. Joanna Norkko1 and
  2. Sandra E. Shumway2

Published Online: 30 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470960967.ch10

Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment

Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment

How to Cite

Norkko, J. and Shumway, S. E. (2011) Bivalves as Bioturbators and Bioirrigators, in Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment (ed S. E. Shumway), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470960967.ch10

Editor Information

  1. Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Tvärminne Zoological Station, University of Helsinki, Finland

  2. 2

    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 10 JUL 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813814131

Online ISBN: 9780470960967

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Keywords:

  • bivalves as bioturbators and bioirrigators;
  • bioturbation and bioirrigation;
  • bivalve molluscs;
  • bivalve bioturbation and bioirrigation processes;
  • redox potential discontinuity layer (RPD);
  • biodeposit production and degradation;
  • sediment biogeochemistry;
  • spatial and temporal scales;
  • benthic effects

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Bivalves are key species in soft-sediment habitats

  • What are bioturbation and bioirrigation?

  • How do healthy soft-sediment bivalve populations affect their surroundings?

  • Summary

  • Literature cited