14. Marine Invaders and Bivalve Aquaculture: Sources, Impacts, and Consequences

  1. Sandra E. Shumway
  1. Dianna K. Padilla1,
  2. Michael J. McCann1 and
  3. Sandra E. Shumway2

Published Online: 30 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470960967.ch14

Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment

Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment

How to Cite

Padilla, D. K., McCann, M. J. and Shumway, S. E. (2011) Marine Invaders and Bivalve Aquaculture: Sources, Impacts, and Consequences, in Shellfish Aquaculture and the Environment (ed S. E. Shumway), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470960967.ch14

Editor Information

  1. Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 10 JUL 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813814131

Online ISBN: 9780470960967

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Keywords:

  • marine invaders and bivalve aquaculture;
  • nonnative species on shellfish aquaculture;
  • “Blue Revolution” in shellfish;
  • bivalve species as ecosystem engineers;
  • bivalve species;
  • feral aquaculture species invasion;
  • species movement;
  • hatchery techniques;
  • harmful algae (HABs);
  • wild species captive culture

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Introduced shellfish from aquaculture

  • Species moved with aquaculture

  • Introduced species that impact aquaculture

  • Recommendations for minimizing spread and impacts of introductions

  • Future needs

  • Acknowledgments

  • Literature cited