16. Looking to the Future

  1. Phil Willmot1 and
  2. Neil Gordon2
  1. Neil Gordon2 and
  2. Phil Willmot1

Published Online: 14 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470973110.ch16

Working Positively with Personality Disorder in Secure Settings: A Practitioner's Perspective

Working Positively with Personality Disorder in Secure Settings: A Practitioner's Perspective

How to Cite

Gordon, N. and Willmot, P. (2010) Looking to the Future, in Working Positively with Personality Disorder in Secure Settings: A Practitioner's Perspective (eds P. Willmot and N. Gordon), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470973110.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Rampton Hospital, UK

  2. 2

    Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham University, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Rampton Hospital, UK

  2. 2

    Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham University, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 22 OCT 2010

Book Series:

  1. Wiley Series in Personality Disorders

Book Series Editors:

  1. Eddie Kane

Series Editor Information

  1. Personality Disorder Institute, University of Nottinghamm UK

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683804

Online ISBN: 9780470973110

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • looking to the future;
  • work in a high secure setting - patients' journey from admission to eventual discharge to conditions of lower security;
  • new NICE guidelines - on antisocial and borderline personality disorders;
  • new Mental Health Act - impetus to reframing our understanding of the needs of those given diagnosis of personality disorder;
  • Pilgrim and ‘ephemeral government social policy priorities’;
  • high secure psychiatric services - last resort for patients, lives shuttling between abusive and neglecting families;
  • colleagues from less secure services - understandably envious of resources and time available in high secure services;
  • ‘service user involvement’ - all-pervasive mantra in health service in recent years;
  • patient ‘voice’ - undermining myths, demonstrating clear insights that these patients can provide;
  • yawning chasm, ethical frontier territory - clinicians working with forensic personality disorder and ethical standards and regulations

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • References