9. Injury Interpretation: Possible Errors and Fallacies

  1. John Gall1 and
  2. Jason Payne-James2
  1. John Gall1 and
  2. Jason Payne-James2

Published Online: 14 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470973158.ch9

Current Practice in Forensic Medicine

Current Practice in Forensic Medicine

How to Cite

Gall, J. and Payne-James, J. (2011) Injury Interpretation: Possible Errors and Fallacies, in Current Practice in Forensic Medicine (eds J. Gall and J. Payne-James), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470973158.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Royal Children's Hospital and Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Australia

  2. 2

    London Hospital Medical College, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Children's Hospital and Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Australia

  2. 2

    London Hospital Medical College, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 4 FEB 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470744871

Online ISBN: 9780470973158

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Keywords:

  • injury interpretation, errors and fallacies - erroneous injury interpretation, conviction of innocent and acquittal of the guilty;
  • injury interpretation ‘experts’ - possible errors in injury interpretation, increasing;
  • interpretation of injuries, not an easy process - being an inexact science;
  • competent interpretation of injury - four key elements, for expert opinion in legal sense;
  • Istanbul Protocol gradation - applied when interpreting certain injuries;
  • injury visualization, by direct personal examination - with photographs, or other documentation;
  • aging of injuries, contentious area - open to a significant range of opinion;
  • child abuse, one of the most emotive areas - in forensic and paediatric medicine;
  • self-inflicted injury, not an uncommon presentation - in psychiatry, emergency department, general practice and clinical forensic medicine;
  • errors, reduced and disasters, as that in Cleveland avoided - a change in jurisdiction medical and bureaucratic mindset, being necessary

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Injury visualization

  • Nomenclature

  • Photography

  • Aging of injuries

  • Force of injury

  • Medical limitations and considerations

  • Genito-anal injuries in the adult

  • Child abuse

  • Self-inflicted injury

  • Other specialist opinions

  • Opinions

  • How to avoid errors

  • References