11. Effects of Psychotropic Drugs on EEG

  1. Nash Boutros1,
  2. Silvana Galderisi2,
  3. Oliver Pogarell3 and
  4. Silvana Riggio4
  1. Silvana Galderisi and
  2. Armida Mucci

Published Online: 14 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470974612.ch11

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

How to Cite

Galderisi, S. and Mucci, A. (2011) Effects of Psychotropic Drugs on EEG, in Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook (eds N. Boutros, S. Galderisi, O. Pogarell and S. Riggio), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470974612.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Wayne State University, School of Medicine. 2751 E, Jefferson, Detroit, MI 48207, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 8018 Naples, Italy

  3. 3

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Nussbaumstr. 7, D-80336 Munich, Germany

  4. 4

    Mount Sinai School of Medicine and James J. Peters VAMC, New York, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 8018 Naples, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 18 MAR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470747827

Online ISBN: 9780470974612

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Keywords:

  • Standard EEG;
  • Drug-induced epileptic disorder;
  • first-generation antipsychotics;
  • second-generation antipsychotics;
  • antidepressants;
  • anxiolytics;
  • lithium;
  • mood stabilizers;
  • recreational drugs;
  • drug-induced delirium;
  • toxic encephalopathy

Summary

All drugs used in psychiatry might induce CNS toxicity, particularly when polypharmacy is required for management of patients. Toxic effects can occur at therapeutic doses when concomitant medical conditions or treatments interfere with drug metabolism and/or cause a potentiation of CNS toxicity, for example in old subjects treated with lithium a delirium due to encephalopathy can be precipitated by renal failure, deydration following diuretics or adjunctive neuroleptic therapy. A standard EEG (sEEG) investigation may be useful to diagnose an encephalopathic process, which will be documented by diffuse slowing or the presence of triphasic waves, or an epileptic condition, indexed by spike and spike-and-wave potentials. Data indicating the usefulness of sEEG for the diagnosis of drug-induced CNS side effects or toxicity are summarized and discussed for antipsychotics, antidepressants, anxiolytics, lithium, other mood stabilizers and recreational drugs. A case vignette of SEEG usefulness in diagnosing drug-induced toxic encephalopathy is provided.