3. EEG Recording and Analysis

  1. Nash Boutros1,
  2. Silvana Galderisi2,
  3. Oliver Pogarell3 and
  4. Silvana Riggio4
  1. Oliver Pogarell

Published Online: 14 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470974612.ch3

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

How to Cite

Pogarell, O. (2011) EEG Recording and Analysis, in Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook (eds N. Boutros, S. Galderisi, O. Pogarell and S. Riggio), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470974612.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Wayne State University, School of Medicine. 2751 E, Jefferson, Detroit, MI 48207, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 8018 Naples, Italy

  3. 3

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Nussbaumstr. 7, D-80336 Munich, Germany

  4. 4

    Mount Sinai School of Medicine and James J. Peters VAMC, New York, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Nussbaumstr. 7, D-80336 Munich, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 18 MAR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470747827

Online ISBN: 9780470974612

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Keywords:

  • Electroencephalography;
  • EEG machine;
  • differential amplification;
  • electrodes;
  • montage;
  • 10-20 system;
  • biological artifacts;
  • technical artifacts

Summary

Detection and recording of brain electric activity from the scalp requires a set of technical devices, including electrodes and an electrode board with separate channels connected to the EEG machine, where the incoming signals are processed by means of differential amplification. Modern EEG devices consist of computerised units with digital recording and storage of the EEG signals which can be processed offline for detailed analysis. The recorded brain electric activity consists of low-amplitude electric signals, highly sensitive to artifacts. Electroencephalography with signal recording, analysis and interpretation requires both a sound methodology and experience in the differentiation between brain electric signals and artifacts. This chapter reviews the principles of electroencephalography in terms of technical backgrounds and requirements, EEG recording and signal analysis. The most frequent biological or technical artefacts will be described and illustrated.