7. EEG in Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

  1. Nash Boutros1,
  2. Silvana Galderisi2,
  3. Oliver Pogarell3 and
  4. Silvana Riggio4
  1. Mary W. Roberts and
  2. Nash Boutros

Published Online: 14 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470974612.ch7

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

How to Cite

Roberts, M. W. and Boutros, N. (2011) EEG in Childhood Psychiatric Disorders, in Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook (eds N. Boutros, S. Galderisi, O. Pogarell and S. Riggio), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470974612.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Wayne State University, School of Medicine. 2751 E, Jefferson, Detroit, MI 48207, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 8018 Naples, Italy

  3. 3

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Nussbaumstr. 7, D-80336 Munich, Germany

  4. 4

    Mount Sinai School of Medicine and James J. Peters VAMC, New York, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. Wayne State University, School of Medicine. 2751 E, Jefferson, Detroit, MI 48207, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 18 MAR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470747827

Online ISBN: 9780470974612

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Keywords:

  • Autism;
  • Autism spectrum disorders;
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder;
  • electrical status epilepticus in slow-wave sleep

Summary

EEG abnormalities in certain childhood disorders are prevalent. Foremost among these are autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit/hyperactivity AD/HD, and violence or aggression. The current widely accepted recommendations do not include a standard EEG work up in any of these conditions in the absence of seizures. This chapter provides evidence that suggests that an EEG work-up could be informative even in the absence of frank seizures. The chapter also provides guidelines to when an EEG is more likely to yield clinically useful information. The chapter further highlights the serious need for much more research in the field of abnormalities of the standard EEG in childhood psychiatric disorders.