2. Pharmacogenetics of Adverse Drug Reactions

  1. John Talbot2,3 and
  2. Jeffrey K. Aronson4
  1. Sudeep P. Pushpakom and
  2. Munir Pirmohamed

Published Online: 30 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9780470975053.ch2

Stephens' Detection and Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions: Principles and Practice, Sixth Edition

Stephens' Detection and Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions: Principles and Practice, Sixth Edition

How to Cite

Pushpakom, S. P. and Pirmohamed, M. (2011) Pharmacogenetics of Adverse Drug Reactions, in Stephens' Detection and Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions: Principles and Practice, Sixth Edition (eds J. Talbot and J. K. Aronson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470975053.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB, UK

  2. 3

    Patient Safety, AstraZeneca R&D, Loughborough, LE11 5RH, UK

  3. 4

    University of Oxford Department of Primary Health Care, Oxford, UK

Author Information

  1. The Wolfson Centre for Personalised Medicine, Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Liverpool, Block A: Waterhouse Buildings, 1-5 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GL, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 2 DEC 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470986349

Online ISBN: 9780470975053

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Keywords:

  • pharmacogenetics;
  • pharmacogenomics;
  • adverse drug reactions;
  • drug response;
  • pharmacokinetic;
  • pharmacodynamic

Summary

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common. Causation is complex and depends on clinical, environmental, and genetic factors. There are genetic predisposing factors in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic pathways. Most studies have focused on candidate gene approaches, but unbiased genome-wide association studies are also being used. Implementation of pharmacogenetic tests to prevent ADRs depends on a number of factors, including the strength of the association, the test characteristics, the practicality of performing the test, and its cost-effectiveness. The demonstration of both clinical validity and clinical usefulness is rare for most pharmacogenetic tests, but it is important that investigators start adopting approaches that will provide such evidence, because without this it is unlikely that effective pharmacogenetic tests will be acceptable to clinicians, patients, regulators, and health-care providers.