21. Experimental Enzymatic Hydrolysis Systems

  1. Charles E. Wyman2,3
  1. Todd Lloyd and
  2. Chaogang Liu

Published Online: 5 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch21

Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

How to Cite

Lloyd, T. and Liu, C. (2013) Experimental Enzymatic Hydrolysis Systems, in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals (ed C. E. Wyman), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch21

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA

  2. 3

    BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA

Author Information

  1. Mascoma Corporation, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 10 MAY 2013

Book Series:

  1. Wiley Series in Renewable Resources

Book Series Editors:

  1. Christian V. Stevens

Series Editor Information

  1. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470972021

Online ISBN: 9780470975831

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Keywords:

  • biomass conversion;
  • enzymatic hydrolysis;
  • experimental;
  • inhibition;
  • kinetics

Summary

Following pretreatment, the feedstock is ready for conversion of the residual polymeric carbohydrates to monomeric sugars that can be fermented or otherwise converted to fuels and chemicals. One means of polymer to monomer conversion that has received extensive attention over the last several decades is hydrolysis by enzymes. This chapter summarizes key methods and procedures that are often applied to evaluate the degree to which the cellulose and hemicellulose in pretreated cellulosic biomass can be hydrolyzed to sugars. In this context, hydrolysis consists of breaking the bonds between sugar molecules in cellulose and/or hemicellulose polymer chains, which consumes one water molecule for each bond broken. Because the enzymatic digestion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass is impacted by a number of enzyme and substrate features, the chapter begins with an overview of the types of enzymes most frequently employed in this service and their interaction with key physical and chemical features of lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose in the feedstocks. It also summarizes kinetic models that can be applied to describe sugar release from enzymatic hydrolysis and how they can account for inhibition by products, acetic acid, sugar degradation products (furfural, HMF, etc.), lignin degradation products, and other components released during pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation.