22. High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass

  1. Charles E. Wyman2,3
  1. Jaclyn DeMartini2,3,† and
  2. Charles E. Wyman2,3

Published Online: 5 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch22

Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

How to Cite

DeMartini, J. and Wyman, C. E. (2013) High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass, in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals (ed C. E. Wyman), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA

  2. 3

    BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA

Author Information

  1. 2

    Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA

  2. 3

    BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA

  1. DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Palo Alto, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 10 MAY 2013

Book Series:

  1. Wiley Series in Renewable Resources

Book Series Editors:

  1. Christian V. Stevens

Series Editor Information

  1. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470972021

Online ISBN: 9780470975831

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • enzymatic hydrolysis;
  • automation;
  • co-hydrolysis;
  • downscaled;
  • high throughput;
  • multiwell plate;
  • one-tube process;
  • pretreatment

Summary

Due to the limited understanding of biomass recalcitrance, there is a need to generate and screen large numbers of plant samples against a variety of pretreatment conditions including various times, temperatures, and chemical addition, as well as a wide range of enzyme sources and formulations. Because of the time-consuming and laborious nature of biomass analytical techniques, conventional testing of sugar release from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis would be prohibitive in terms of both time and cost. As a result, high-throughput pretreatment and hydrolysis (HTPH) systems capable of providing basic sugar release data for large sample sets were developed. In this chapter four published HTPH systems are reviewed, including a detailed examination of how each accomplish the basic steps that are required: material preparation, material distribution, pretreatment reaction, and sample preparation and analysis. Additionally, the HTPH philosophy, as well as difficulties and limitations that can be associated with these systems, is presented, followed by a review of successful applications to date and possible future uses.