25. Epidemiology of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

  1. Ming T. Tsuang2,3,
  2. Mauricio Tohen4,5 and
  3. Peter B. Jones6
  1. Stephen V. Faraone

Published Online: 19 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470976739.ch25

Textbook of Psychiatric Epidemiology, Third Edition

Textbook of Psychiatric Epidemiology, Third Edition

How to Cite

Faraone, S. V. (2011) Epidemiology of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in Textbook of Psychiatric Epidemiology, Third Edition (eds M. T. Tsuang, M. Tohen and P. B. Jones), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470976739.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Center for Behavioral Genomics, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla CA 92039, USA

  2. 3

    Harvard Institute of Psychiatric Epidemiology & Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Centre at San Antonio, USA

  4. 5

    Division of Mood and Anxiety Disorders, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7526 Louis Pasteur Drive, San Antonio TX 78229-3900, USA

  5. 6

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Box 189, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK

Author Information

  1. Center for NeuroPsychiatric Genetics, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Weiskotten Hall 3285, Syracuse NY 13210, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 15 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470694671

Online ISBN: 9780470976739

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Keywords:

  • ADHD;
  • prevalence;
  • pharmacoeconomics;
  • genetics;
  • environment;
  • risk factors

Summary

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a disorder of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity that affects 8-12% of children worldwide. Although the prevalence of the disorder declines with age, at least half of ADHD children will have impairing symptoms of the disorder in adulthood. Twin, adoption and molecular genetic studies show ADHD to be highly heritable and other work documents obstetric complications, and psychosocial adversity as predisposing risk factors. Molecular genetic studies have implicated several genes as risk factors for the disorder. It is likely that many genetic and environmental risk factors combine to cause the disorder's onset.