4. Hydrogen Adsorption on Metal Organic Framework Materials for Storage Applications

  1. Duncan W. Bruce2,
  2. Dermot O'Hare3 and
  3. Richard I. Walton4
  1. K. Mark Thomas

Published Online: 9 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470977798.ch4

Energy Materials

Energy Materials

How to Cite

Thomas, K. M. (2011) Hydrogen Adsorption on Metal Organic Framework Materials for Storage Applications, in Energy Materials (eds D. W. Bruce, D. O'Hare and R. I. Walton), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470977798.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Chemistry, University of York, UK

  2. 3

    Chemistry Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, UK

  3. 4

    Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, UK

Author Information

  1. Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 FEB 2011
  2. Published Print: 18 FEB 2011

Book Series:

  1. Inorganic Materials Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Duncan W. Bruce2,
  2. Dermot O'Hare3 and
  3. Richard I. Walton4

Series Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Chemistry, University of York, UK

  2. 3

    Chemistry Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, UK

  3. 4

    Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, UK

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470997529

Online ISBN: 9780470977798

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Keywords:

  • hydrogen adsorption, on metal organic framework (MOF) material - storage applications;
  • hydrogen-based economy - major scientific and engineering challenges;
  • hydrogen storage requirements for vehicles - safety issues, refuelling range and system storage weight;
  • hydrogen, higher combustion enthalpy - than hydrocarbon fuels on weight basis;
  • hydrogen adsorption experimental methods;
  • activation of MOFS - supercritical carbon dioxide drying, activating MOF porous structures;
  • adsorption on MOFs - framework flexibility and structural change;
  • developing materials, at cryogenic temperatures - meeting US DOE targets;
  • porous material design, improved adsorption capacity - and hydrogen surface site interaction;
  • understanding of surface chemistry and framework flexibility - MOFs with improved hydrogen adsorption characteristics

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Hydrogen Adsorption Experimental Methods

  • Activation of MOFs

  • Hydrogen Adsorption on MOFs

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgements

  • References