Chapter 7. The Pathogenesis of NASH: Human Studies

  1. Geoffrey C. Farrell1,
  2. Jacob George2,
  3. Pauline de la M. Hall3 and
  4. Arthur J. McCullough4
  1. Arun J. Sanyal

Published Online: 25 OCT 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470987438.ch7

Fatty Liver Disease: NASH and Related Disorders

Fatty Liver Disease: NASH and Related Disorders

How to Cite

Sanyal, A. J. (2004) The Pathogenesis of NASH: Human Studies, in Fatty Liver Disease: NASH and Related Disorders (eds G. C. Farrell, J. George, P. de la M. Hall and A. J. McCullough), Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470987438.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Director, Storr Liver Unit, Westmead Hospital, Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia

  2. 2

    Director, Clinical Hepatology, Storr Liver Unit, Westmead Hospital, Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia

  3. 3

    University of Cape Town, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Observatory, Cape Town 7925, South Africa

  4. 4

    Division of Gastroenterology, MetroHealth Medical Center and Schwartz Center for Metabolism and Nutrition, Cleveland, OH 44102-1998, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 OCT 2007
  2. Published Print: 28 OCT 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405112925

Online ISBN: 9780470987438

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Keywords:

  • nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH);
  • insulin;
  • fatty acids;
  • lipolysis;
  • esterification

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Abstract

  • Introduction

  • Evidence to support a metabolic basis for NAFLD

  • Insulin resistance and the genesis of a fatty liver

  • From steatosis to steatohepatitis: mechanisms of increased oxidative stress

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgement