Self-Organization and Pattern Formation in Primate Cortical Networks

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Henry Kennedy1,2,3,4,
  2. Rodney Douglas2,3,4,5,
  3. Kenneth Knoblauch2,3,4 and
  4. Colette Dehay2,3,4

Published Online: 1 FEB 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470994030.ch13

Cortical Development: Genes and Genetic Abnormalities: Novartis Foundation Symposium 288

Cortical Development: Genes and Genetic Abnormalities: Novartis Foundation Symposium 288

How to Cite

Kennedy, H., Douglas, R., Knoblauch, K. and Dehay, C. (2008) Self-Organization and Pattern Formation in Primate Cortical Networks, in Cortical Development: Genes and Genetic Abnormalities: Novartis Foundation Symposium 288 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470994030.ch13

Author Information

  1. 1

    Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, INSERM U846, 18 avenue Doyen Lépine, F-69675 Bron Cedex, France

  2. 2

    Inserm, U846, 18 Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69500 Bron, France

  3. 3

    Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, 69500 Bron, France

  4. 4

    Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, 69003, Lyon, France

  5. 5

    Institute of Neuroinformatics, University/ETH, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich 8057, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 FEB 2008
  2. Published Print: 11 JAN 2008

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470060926

Online ISBN: 9780470994030

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Keywords:

  • corticogenesis;
  • development;
  • neocortex;
  • macaque;
  • monkey;
  • connections;
  • pathways;
  • proliferation;
  • axogenesis;
  • cell cycle

Summary

The primate neocortex is characterized by a highly expanded supragranular layer (SGL). The interareal connectivity of the neurons in the SLG largely determines the cortical hierarchy that constrains information flow through the cortex. Interareal connectivity is made by precise numbers of connections, raising the possibility that the physiology of a target area is dictated by the numbers of connections and hierarchical distance in each of the pathways that it receives. The developmental mechanisms ensuring the precision of these interareal networks is in part determined by (i) the numbers of SGL neurons generated by the OSVZ, a primate-specific germinal zone. Neuron generation rate in the OSVZ is determined by regulation of the G1 phase of the cellcycle. This regulation is area-specific and is linked to thalamic projections to the OSVZ; (ii) Prolonged pre- and postnatal pruning of connections originating from the SGL when the infant monkey visually explores its environment. Remodelling serves to sharpen initial patterns of connections and establishes the adult hierarchy. These results suggest that primate cortical networks underlying high-level function undergo prolonged selforganization via regressive phenomena in the cortical plate (axon elimination) and progressive phenomena (directed growth of cortical axons).