Chapter 9. Using Statistical Process Control for Continual Improvement

  1. Shirley Coleman Technical Director3,
  2. Tony Greenfield4,
  3. Dave Stewardson3 and
  4. Douglas C. Montgomery5
  1. Donald J. Wheeler1 and
  2. Øystein Evandt2,3

Published Online: 3 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470997482.ch9

Statistical Practice in Business and Industry

Statistical Practice in Business and Industry

How to Cite

Wheeler, D. J. and Evandt, Ø. (2008) Using Statistical Process Control for Continual Improvement, in Statistical Practice in Business and Industry (eds S. Coleman, T. Greenfield, D. Stewardson and D. C. Montgomery), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470997482.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Industrial Statistics Research Unit, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK

  2. 4

    Greenfield Research, Little Hucklow, Buxton SK17 8RT, UK

  3. 5

    Regents' Professor of Industrial Engineering & Statistics, ASU Foundation Professor of Engineering, Department of Industrial Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287-5906, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    SPC Press, Suite C, 5908 Toole Drive, Knoxville, TN 37919, USA

  2. 2

    DNV, P.O. Box 300, 1322 Hovik, Norway

  3. 3

    Industrial Statistics Research Unit, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 7 MAR 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470014974

Online ISBN: 9780470997482

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Keywords:

  • statistical process control (SPC);
  • Western approach to quality - burn the toast and scrape it';
  • cut-your-losses approach;
  • Shewhart's approach and two-point moving ranges;
  • process behavior chart;
  • threshold state (product trouble);
  • brink of chaos (process trouble);
  • cycle of despair;
  • Shewart's approach - existing data learning

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The problem of variation

  • Shewhart's approach

  • Learning from Process Data

  • The average and range chart

  • The chart for individual values and moving ranges

  • So what can we learn from a process behavior chart?

  • Four possibilities for any process

  • How can three-sigma limits work with all types of data?

  • Some misunderstandings about SPC

  • Shewhart's approach to learning from existing data

  • References

  • Further reading