11. The Role of Nonverbal Communication in Interpersonal Relations

  1. Leonard M. Horowitz PhD2 and
  2. Stephen Strack PhD3
  1. Robert Gifford PhD

Published Online: 16 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118001868.ch11

Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment, and Therapeutic Interventions

Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment, and Therapeutic Interventions

How to Cite

Gifford, R. (2010) The Role of Nonverbal Communication in Interpersonal Relations, in Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment, and Therapeutic Interventions (eds L. M. Horowitz and S. Strack), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118001868.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

  2. 3

    Psychology Service, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychology and School of, Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 22 NOV 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470471609

Online ISBN: 9781118001868

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Keywords:

  • nonverbal communication;
  • lens model;
  • nonverbal cues to power;
  • deception and nonverbal cues;
  • cultural differences in nonverbal behavior

Summary

Nonverbal communication is an essential but sometimes overlooked dimension of interpersonal relations. Crucial information related to power, deception, emotion, attraction, and relationship outcome is exchanged in personal and, increasingly, computer-mediated interactions through multiple channels (gaze, facial movements, gesture, interpersonal distance, etc.) in multiple social contexts. Complicating matters, this information often is sent differently by individuals who differ in gender, personality, culture, status, legibility (of senders), and decoding ability (of receivers). Complementing several current theories of nonverbal communication, a modern version of Brunswik's lens model is offered as a general framework for understanding accurate and inaccurate inferences from nonverbal cues as people navigate their new, continuing, and concluding relationships.