22. Power Estimation

  1. Bradley E. Huitema

Published Online: 14 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118067475.ch22

The Analysis of Covariance and Alternatives: Statistical Methods for Experiments, Quasi-Experiments, and Single-Case Studies, Second Edition

The Analysis of Covariance and Alternatives: Statistical Methods for Experiments, Quasi-Experiments, and Single-Case Studies, Second Edition

How to Cite

Huitema, B. E. (2011) Power Estimation, in The Analysis of Covariance and Alternatives: Statistical Methods for Experiments, Quasi-Experiments, and Single-Case Studies, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118067475.ch22

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 OCT 2011
  2. Published Print: 14 OCT 2011

Book Series:

  1. Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics

Book Series Editors:

  1. Walter A. Shewhart and
  2. Samuel S. Wilks

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471748960

Online ISBN: 9781118067475

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Keywords:

  • ANCOVA;
  • ANOVA;
  • power estimation;
  • standardized effect

Summary

Power estimation is an important step in the design of experiments, regardless of the method of analysis. This chapter describes how to estimate power for ANOVA by using the Minitab routine. The same routine is appropriate for ANCOVA power estimation. Some researchers prefer to estimate ANOVA power for standardized effect sizes rather than for effects measured in the original metric. The estimation of power may facilitate the design of experiments in two ways. First, it may prevent the initiation of an experiment that has a poor chance of detecting an important difference. Second, it may eliminate the use of more subjects than are required to answer the question of interest. There is little difference between the method used to estimate power for ANCOVA and the method that applies to ANOVA.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

analysis of covariance; analysis of variance