18. An Integrative Humanistic Play Therapy Approach to Treating Adopted Children With a History of Attachment Disruptions

  1. Athena A. Drewes,
  2. Sue C. Bratton and
  3. Charles E. Schaefer
  1. Sue C. Bratton,
  2. Kara Carnes-Holt and
  3. Peggy L. Ceballos

Published Online: 16 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118094792.ch18

Integrative Play Therapy

Integrative Play Therapy

How to Cite

Bratton, S. C., Carnes-Holt, K. and Ceballos, P. L. (2011) An Integrative Humanistic Play Therapy Approach to Treating Adopted Children With a History of Attachment Disruptions, in Integrative Play Therapy (eds A. A. Drewes, S. C. Bratton and C. E. Schaefer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118094792.ch18

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 JUN 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 JUL 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470617922

Online ISBN: 9781118094792

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • integrative humanistic play therapy;
  • adopted children;
  • attachment disruptions;
  • attachment relationship;
  • therapist-child relationship

Summary

In this chapter, we focus on a humanistic play therapy approach that can demonstrate the complexity of treating children who have experienced multiple attachment disruptions in their early development. Using this approach, a healthy parent–child relationship is attained which in turn provides a secure base and facilitates child's dynamic growth. Disruption in care giving relationship can result in neuro disorders, sensory issues, short-term memory loss, increased anxiety, and fear. A myriad of outward behaviors in a child results due to repeated early interpersonal traumas. The process of attachment is nothing but the well being of the child. In all the cases, understanding the attachment theory informs the clinician the problem and also makes decision making easy. Furthermore, a humanistic and attachment perspective is given by explaining the relationship dynamics between therapist and child. For this, a child-centered play therapy is used which helps the therapist to develop a warm relationship with the child.