12. On the Performance of Wireless Indoor Localization Using Received Signal Strength

  1. Seyed A. (Reza) Zekavat3 and
  2. R. Michael Buehrer4
  1. Jie Yang1,
  2. Yingying Chen1,
  3. Richard P. Martin2,
  4. Wade Trappe2 and
  5. Marco Gruteser2

Published Online: 6 SEP 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118104750.ch12

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances

How to Cite

Yang, J., Chen, Y., Martin, R. P., Trappe, W. and Gruteser, M. (2011) On the Performance of Wireless Indoor Localization Using Received Signal Strength, in Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances (eds S. A. (. Zekavat and R. M. Buehrer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118104750.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA

  2. 4

    Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA

  2. 2

    Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2011
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470943427

Online ISBN: 9781118104750

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Keywords:

  • localization performance;
  • received signal strength (RSS);
  • Wi-Fi network;
  • wireless indoor localization;
  • ZigBee network

Summary

This chapter focuses on received signal strength (RSS)-based indoor positioning. It first provides an overview of various wireless indoor localization techniques employing RSS including lateration methods, machine learning classification, probabilistic approaches, and statistical supervised learning techniques. The chapter then compares their performance in terms of localization accuracy through measurement studies in real office building environments under representative Wi-Fi and ZigBee wireless networks. It further surveys techniques and methods that are developed to support robust wireless localization and to improve localization accuracy, including real-time RSS calibration via anchor verification, closely spaced multiple antennas, taking advantage of robust statistical methods to provide stability to contaminated measurements, utilizing linear regression to characterize the relationship between RSS and the distance to anchors, and exploiting RSS spatial correlation. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of popular location-based applications.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

Indoor radio communication; performance evaluation; position measurement; wireless LAN; Zigbee