23. Collaborative Position Location

  1. Seyed A. (Reza) Zekavat1 and
  2. R. Michael Buehrer2
  1. R. Michael Buehrer and
  2. Tao Jia

Published Online: 6 SEP 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118104750.ch23

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances

How to Cite

Buehrer, R. M. and Jia, T. (2011) Collaborative Position Location, in Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances (eds S. A. (. Zekavat and R. M. Buehrer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118104750.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA

  2. 2

    Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

Author Information

  1. Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2011
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470943427

Online ISBN: 9781118104750

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Keywords:

  • collaborative position location;
  • Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB);
  • non-line-of- sight (NLOS) propagation;
  • weighted least squares (LS)

Summary

This chapter describes collaborative position location, that is, position location techniques where the nodes to be localized collaborate to determine their positions. This is sometimes also called cooperative position location or network position location to distinguish it from traditional position location techniques which localize a single node. The chapter examines two main bounds for collaborative positioning, namely, the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and the weighted least squares (LS) solution. Although the bounds are somewhat different, they both provide guidance as to the achievable performance. The chapter then describes several suboptimal approaches and compares their performance in various network configurations. Lastly, it examines the impact of non-line-of- sight (NLOS) propagation and describes one particular technique to mitigate its effects.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

least squares approximations; Non-line-of- sight propagation; position measurement; radio propagation