29. Digital Signal Processing in GNSS Receivers

  1. Seyed A. (Reza) Zekavat3 and
  2. R. Michael Buehrer4
  1. Maurizio Fantino1,
  2. Letizia Lo Presti2 and
  3. Marco Pini1

Published Online: 6 SEP 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118104750.ch29

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances

How to Cite

Fantino, M., Presti, L. L. and Pini, M. (2011) Digital Signal Processing in GNSS Receivers, in Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances (eds S. A. (. Zekavat and R. M. Buehrer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118104750.ch29

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA

  2. 4

    Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Istituto Superiore Mario Boella, Turin, Italy

  2. 2

    Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2011
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470943427

Online ISBN: 9781118104750

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Keywords:

  • digital signal processing;
  • fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based methods;
  • global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers;
  • radio frequency (RF) signal;
  • signal acquisition;
  • signal in space (SIS) detection;
  • signal tracking

Summary

This chapter presents the algorithms of digital signal processing implemented in the physical layer of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers. It starts with the analysis of the radio frequency (RF) signal received at the antenna and highlights the presence of a Doppler frequency shift. The chapter then illustrates the frequency down-conversion of the received signal and the sampling stage. It presents the general structure of the digital section of the receiver, and gives details on the subsystems in charge of acquiring and tracking signal in spaces (SISs). The chapter provides a survey of the detection and estimation theory, which is at the basis of the acquisition methods. It introduces some strategies able to reduce the complexity of classical acquisition algorithms. The chapter describes both conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based methods, Bayesian sequential detection, and gradient methods. Finally, it addresses the transient between signal acquisition and tracking.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

digital signal processing; fast Fourier transforms; radio frequency; receivers; satellite navigation; tracking