5. Subjecting Ourselves to Capital Punishment

  1. Matthew C. Altman

Published Online: 6 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118114162.ch5

Kant and Applied Ethics: The Uses and Limits of Kant's Practical Philosophy

Kant and Applied Ethics: The Uses and Limits of Kant's Practical Philosophy

How to Cite

Altman, M. C. (2011) Subjecting Ourselves to Capital Punishment, in Kant and Applied Ethics: The Uses and Limits of Kant's Practical Philosophy, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118114162.ch5

Author Information

  1. Ellensburg, Wash., USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 OCT 2011
  2. Published Print: 30 SEP 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470657669

Online ISBN: 9781118114162

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Keywords:

  • Kantian arguments against Kant's conclusions;
  • subjecting ourselves to capital punishment;
  • retribution, not warranting capital punishment, in practice;
  • morality and legality, retribution justified;
  • retribution and the death penalty, agent's action;
  • severity of a crime, depending on crime committed;
  • Kant's transcendental idealism;
  • the law of retribution, not constraining one;
  • Qua law, moral law binding rational beings;
  • Kant and capital punishment, fallibility of legal judgments

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Difference between Morality and Legality

  • Retribution and the Death Penalty

  • Consenting to Capital Punishment

  • Determining the “Inner Wickedness” of the Accused

  • The Fallibility of Justice

  • Capital Punishment Cannot Be Categorically Demanded of Us

  • A Moral Assessment of the Supposed Duty to Kill

  • Do These Objections Rule Out All Punishments?

  • Whose Dignity Is at Stake?