Chapter

12 Behavior Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Clinical Psychology

II. PSYCHOTHERAPY

  1. W. Edward Craighead PhD1,
  2. Linda W. Craighead PhD2,
  3. Lorie A. Ritschel PhD3,
  4. Alexandra Zagoloff PhD4

Published Online: 26 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118133880.hop208012

Handbook of Psychology, Second Edition

Handbook of Psychology, Second Edition

How to Cite

Craighead, W. E., Craighead, L. W., Ritschel, L. A. and Zagoloff, A. 2012. Behavior Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. Handbook of Psychology, Second Edition. 8:II:12.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Emory University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychology, Atlanta, GA, USA

  2. 2

    Emory University, Department of Psychology, Atlanta, GA, USA

  3. 3

    Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Atlanta, GA, USA

  4. 4

    Emory University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Atlanta, GA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 SEP 2012

Abstract

This chapter reviews the history of behavior therapy and the evolution of cognitive behavior therapy, and notes the emergence of the third-wave behavioral therapies, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). The major focus of the chapter is describing the current state of the literature evaluating the application of behavioral and cognitive behavior therapies to a range of clinical problems, including anxiety, eating disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. Specific interventions, such as exposure and response prevention, are discussed within the context of the disorder they were designed to treat. Major research findings are reported, and modifications to standard treatment applications are reviewed when relevant (e.g., the inclusion of partners or families in treatment). Summaries and conclusions are provided, and future directions are discussed.

Keywords:

  • behavior therapy;
  • cognitive behavior therapy;
  • behavioral activation;
  • exposure and response prevention;
  • dialectical behavior therapy;
  • acceptance and commitment therapy;
  • family-focused therapy;
  • panic control therapy;
  • transdiagnostic therapy