14. Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Mercury through Food Webs

  1. Guangliang Liu3,
  2. Yong Cai3 and
  3. Nelson O'Driscoll4
  1. Karen Kidd1,
  2. Meredith Clayden1 and
  3. Tim Jardine2

Published Online: 1 DEC 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118146644.ch14

Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology of Mercury

Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology of Mercury

How to Cite

Kidd, K., Clayden, M. and Jardine, T. (2011) Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Mercury through Food Webs, in Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology of Mercury (eds G. Liu, Y. Cai and N. O'Driscoll), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118146644.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA

  2. 4

    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, K.C. Irving Environmental Science Center, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Canadian Rivers Institute and Biology Department, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

  2. 2

    Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 DEC 2011
  2. Published Print: 18 NOV 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470578728

Online ISBN: 9781118146644

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Keywords:

  • food webs, Hg bioaccumulation;
  • abiotic cycling of Hg;
  • Hg biomagnifications

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Organisms

  • Mercury within Organisms

  • Factors Affecting Mercury in Biota

  • Biomagnification of Mercury Through Food Webs

  • Mercury Stable Isotopes in Bioaccumulation Studies

  • Case Study—Kejimkujik National Park and Historic Site, Nova Scotia, Canada

  • Conclusions

  • References