3. Why the SPB Control Plane Looks as it does

  1. David Allan and
  2. Nigel Bragg

Published Online: 13 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118164327.ch3

802.1aq Shortest Path Bridging Design and Evolution: The Architect's Perspective

802.1aq Shortest Path Bridging Design and Evolution: The Architect's Perspective

How to Cite

Allan, D. and Bragg, N. (2012) Why the SPB Control Plane Looks as it does, in 802.1aq Shortest Path Bridging Design and Evolution: The Architect's Perspective, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118164327.ch3

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 FEB 2012
  2. Published Print: 23 FEB 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118148662

Online ISBN: 9781118164327

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Keywords:

  • Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS);
  • routing system;
  • shortest path bridging (SPB)

Summary

This chapter explains how essentially all the control functionality for Shortest Path Bridging (SPB) can be delivered by the routing system alone. The chapter starts with a brief introduction to the task to be performed and introduce the concept of putting all the required information to construct all aspects of data plane forwarding into the routing system. It then discusses in some detail SPBM's most radical departure from previous received wisdom, the complete elimination of signaling from both unicast and multicast state installations. The chapter then provides a factual introduction to the extensions to the Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS - IS) routing protocol required by SPB, showing how modest these are. Finally, it explains some of the algorithmic innovations over previous link state practices that are exploited by SPB.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

routing