8. Functionality of Non-Starch Polysaccharides (NSPs)

  1. Athapol Noomhorm,
  2. Imran Ahmad and
  3. Anil Kumar Anal
  1. Kelvin K. T. Goh1,
  2. Ramesh Kumar2 and
  3. Shen-Siung Wong2

Published Online: 21 MAR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118227800.ch8

Functional Foods and Dietary Supplements: Processing Effects and Health Benefits

Functional Foods and Dietary Supplements: Processing Effects and Health Benefits

How to Cite

Goh, K. K. T., Kumar, R. and Wong, S.-S. (2014) Functionality of Non-Starch Polysaccharides (NSPs), in Functional Foods and Dietary Supplements: Processing Effects and Health Benefits (eds A. Noomhorm, I. Ahmad and A. K. Anal), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118227800.ch8

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

  2. 2

    Massey University, Singapore Campus

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2014
  2. Published Print: 6 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118227879

Online ISBN: 9781118227800

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Keywords:

  • food product;
  • functional properties;
  • immunostimulants;
  • non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs);
  • prebiotics;
  • starch digestibility

Summary

This chapter reviews recent advances in the field of non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs) research. Soluble NSPs play a major role as additives in the food industry; they possess important physicochemical properties that can be used thicken, stabilize, gel and emulsify food products. Polysaccharide modification provides avenues for enhancing or modifying the functional properties of known NSPs. The discussion is based on recent studies on how NSPs influence human health. The chapter focuses on the function of NSPs as prebiotics and immunostimulants and their influence on starch digestibility. It discusses the interactions of NSPs with other food ingredients, such as starch, colourants, flavour compounds, salt and sugar. NSP interactions are important for food scientists and food product developers because these components are present in many food systems. Understanding these interactions is necessary for determining optimum processing methods, selecting appropriate ingredients in formulating food products and designing them for optimum nutrition.