4. The Unanticipated Difficult Airway: The ‘Can't Intubate, Can't Ventilate’ Scenario

  1. Ian Johnston2,
  2. William Harrop-Griffiths3 and
  3. Leslie Gemmell4
  1. Mansukh Popat

Published Online: 10 NOV 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781118227978.ch4

AAGBI Core Topics in Anaesthesia

AAGBI Core Topics in Anaesthesia

How to Cite

Popat, M. (2011) The Unanticipated Difficult Airway: The ‘Can't Intubate, Can't Ventilate’ Scenario, in AAGBI Core Topics in Anaesthesia (eds I. Johnston, W. Harrop-Griffiths and L. Gemmell), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118227978.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, UK

  2. 3

    Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK

  3. 4

    Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wrexham, UK

Author Information

  1. Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, NHS Trust, Oxford, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 NOV 2011
  2. Published Print: 29 NOV 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658628

Online ISBN: 9781118227978

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Keywords:

  • unanticipated difficult airway;
  • ‘Can't Intubate, Can't Ventilate’ (CICV);
  • tracheal intubation;
  • safe airway management;
  • Difficult Airway Society (DAS) guidelines;
  • DAS algorithm;
  • CICV recognition;
  • cricothyroidotomy, CICV situation;
  • Portex PCK device

Summary

• The ‘can't intubate, can't ventilate’ (CICV) scenario is very rare and you should almost always be able to avoid it with good airway management skills.

• Recognize the scenario promptly if it happens.

• The decision to perform a cricothyroidotomy should be taken quickly if noninvasive methods of lung ventilation have failed.

• Use equipment and a technique of cricothyroidotomy that are most familiar to you.

• Practise airway management techniques regularly on a manikin to maintain your skills.