6.4. The Gameboard “Model Building”

  1. Jacqueline Beckley2,
  2. Dulce Paredes Ph.D.3 and
  3. Kannapon Lopetcharats Ph.D.4
  1. Cornelia Ramsey Ph.D., MSPH

Published Online: 27 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118229248.ch6c

Product Innovation Toolbox: A Field Guide to Consumer Understanding and Research

Product Innovation Toolbox: A Field Guide to Consumer Understanding and Research

How to Cite

Ramsey, C. (2012) The Gameboard “Model Building”, in Product Innovation Toolbox: A Field Guide to Consumer Understanding and Research (eds J. Beckley, D. Paredes and K. Lopetcharats), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118229248.ch6c

Editor Information

  1. 2

    The Understanding & Insight Group LLC, Denville, New Jersey, USA

  2. 3

    Takasago International Corporation (USA), Rockleigh, New Jersey, USA

  3. 4

    NuvoCentric, Bangkok, Thailand

Author Information

  1. Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 FEB 2012
  2. Published Print: 2 MAY 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813823973

Online ISBN: 9781118229248

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Keywords:

  • gameboard “model building”;
  • in-context interviewing;
  • creative process model;
  • narrative technique;
  • graphic technique;
  • four-stage creative process model;
  • descriptive analysis;
  • central theme analysis;
  • mental models;
  • schema theory;
  • theory of creativity

Summary

The gameboard “model building” procedure develops authentically consumer-centered products that meet consumer expectations from the onset of development. The idea behind the technique is that it allows for product innovation to be constructed by consumers directly. By identifying and defining the key elements via the model construction procedures, the consumers are able to examine their current product experiences in new ways because they deconstruct the product by individual attribute. Once they are engaged, the participants' true preferences are brought out via interview which allows for more “out of box” thinking. This technique offers a concrete picture of consumer preferences in a cost and time effective manner by using prototypes early in the consumer research process. Utilizing consumer's own creativity, this new qualitative methodology manifests consumer's cognitive processes and mental schema involved in learning and decision making.