3. Women, Mechanical Science, and God in the Early Modern Period

  1. J. B. Stump2 and
  2. Alan G. Padgett3
  1. Jacqueline Broad

Published Online: 19 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118241455.ch3

The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity

The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity

How to Cite

Broad, J. (2012) Women, Mechanical Science, and God in the Early Modern Period, in The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity (eds J. B. Stump and A. G. Padgett), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118241455.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Bethel College, Indiana, USA

  2. 3

    Luther Seminary in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA

Author Information

  1. Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444335712

Online ISBN: 9781118241455

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Keywords:

  • women, mechanical science and God, the early modern period;
  • English women, and responses to Descartes's work;
  • personification of nature, and women's role in it;
  • natural philosophy of women, the early modern period;
  • Descartes' heliocentric theory, in Le monde;
  • Cavendish, Conway, Behn, Astell, addressing Descartes' Principles;
  • Cavendish's positive conception of woman-as-nature;
  • Conway's woman-as-nature “…living body which has life and perception”;
  • Conway, Cavendish arguing of, Cartesian mechanization of nature;
  • conceptions, positive depictions of women as thinking beings

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Margaret Cavendish (1623–1673)

  • Anne Conway (1631–1679)

  • Aphra Behn (1640–1689)

  • Mary Astell (1666–1731)

  • Conclusion

  • Notes

  • References