14. Who's in Control? Guidelines for e-Learning Navigation

  1. Ruth Colvin Clark and
  2. Richard E. Mayer

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118255971.ch14

e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition

e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition

How to Cite

Clark, R. C. and Mayer, R. E. (2011) Who's in Control? Guidelines for e-Learning Navigation, in e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition, Pfeiffer, San Francisco, CA, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118255971.ch14

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470874301

Online ISBN: 9781118255971

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Keywords:

  • adaptive control;
  • e-learning;
  • instructional elements;
  • learner control;
  • program control

Summary

Learner control is implemented by navigational features such as menus, site maps, and links that allow learners to select the topics and instructional elements they prefer. Learners with higher prior knowledge can typically make good choices under conditions of high learner control. This chapter summarizes new research on adaptive control in which instructional elements are dynamically personalized based on learner performance during the lesson. Control over the content and pace of a lesson is a common feature of asynchronous e-learning. Most synchronous forms of e-learning operate in program control mode—also called instructional control. A review of research on learner versus program control concludes that learners with little prior knowledge of the subject as well as poor metacognitive skills are likely to do better with program control—especially in high-complexity courses.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

control procedure; learning